The first thing I noticed in looking for a cover image of Jennifer Lynn Barnes’ latest novel, The Naturals, is that there are a lot of really bad covers for this book. The version I read is fairly non-descript, something that suits the crime mystery novel inside of it. Alternate versions of the cover make the book look more teeny-bopper than it is, even though there is plenty of that.

naturalsThe Naturals is about a group of teens that are recruited by the FBI because of their special skills. Not super powers, thankfully, but simpler things, like lie detection, profiling, and ability with statistics. The kids are chosen and moved into a house near Washington, where they will be trained and eventually allowed to help the FBI solve cold cases- murders gone long unsolved by the Bureau.

Cassie joins the team, because she is tired of her ordinary 17-year-old life as a waitress, and maintains ideas that she can solve the unsolved murder of her mother, which happened five years before.

The novel is pretty squeaky-clean as far as YA goes, and it does little to push the boundaries in any of the areas that it dabbles in. This is good, in the sense that it is an easily recommendable read for almost any teen. You don’t need to worry about sex, drugs, swearing, and gore in this novel. Despite being about the hunt for a serial killer, The Naturals does not have the graphic violence that a novel like I Hunt Killers had.

There is an awkward, unnecessary, and fairly baseless love triangle that develops in the house, and really, it has very little to do with the story. It it far too predictable, from the moment Cassie walks into the house, and it does little to develop any of the characters, or push the plot in any direction or another. But, Barnes keeps it clean, and even though it is pretty much there only to appeal more to a female audience, it doesn’t do any real harm.

As for the mystery itself, it is pretty good. While being trained how to read crime scenes and files, Cassie and the FBI agents are thrown into the solving of a case that is eerily familiar to Cassie, as all the new victims bear a resemblance to her dead mother. And Cassie seems to be next on the list for the killer. This leads us on the chase for the new killer in town, before it is too late for his next victim, or to see if Cassie is his next victim. Barnes provides us with a few good hints along the way, and a couple of possibly killers, and does a pretty good job of keeping us guessing throughout the novel, as to who did it. I don’t know that the end was terribly satisfying, but at least I was kept guessing, which not all mysteries are able to do.

I think that The Naturals is an entertaining read, and it won’t take most readers long to plunge through the 308 pages of the book. It is not high-end literature, but it serves well as a relaxing book where we want to be taken on a fairly interesting journey to discover something bad.

Barnes has written a novel that has a fairly broad appeal. Despite having a female protagonist, and the aforementioned love story, boys might like this book as well because of the crimes, the idea of serial killers, the typically male characters, and the sultry character of Lia. As I said, for a crime novel, there is little that is offensive in here, to the point where there are some lines like, “…to figure out what the Hello Kitty went on the night before.” Case in point. Barnes took the time to ensure her novel wouldn’t write itself into a corner, and would be okay reading material for as many teens as possible.

There is nothing particularly special about The Naturals. Okay characters, pretty good story, solid mystery. But, overall, it is a pretty decent read.

2 thoughts on “The Naturals (Book Review)

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