Nick Cave is a mad genius.

The singer, known best as the frontman of groups such as The Birthday Party and the more famous Bad Seeds, is also a damn fine writer.

For those who have seen him live (https://gatsbyfuneral.wordpress.com/2014/06/29/nick-cave-and-the-bad-seeds-in-edmonton-concert-review/), understand how he is a psychotic preacher on stage, taking the audience in, and not releasing his firm grip around their necks until the show has concluded. He can command an audience unlike many vocalists out there. When he is on stage, he owns the audience, bringing them into his world of darkness, love, and murder, before releasing them, gasping, into the night.

bunny2Many years ago, I read And the Ass Saw the Angel, and was taken in by Nick Cave’s dark, gothic, prose. It was a good book. Disturbing, as would be expected from someone like Cave, but undeniably well written.

Upon realizing that he had another novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, I immediately pounced upon it, ready to be taken into his dark world once again.

And I was definitely not disappointed. In fact, I was riveted.

Bunny Munro is a degenerate who sells women’s beauty products door-to-door, a man who proclaims that he could sell “a bicycle to a barracuda.” Bunny is obsessed with sex, and his depraved sexual fantasies often rule his day-to-day existence. Despite trying to sleep with every woman who has a pulse, Bunny is married, and has a young son, Bunny Junior.

When his wife commits suicide, Bunny is left in the care of his son, and is forced to face a strange world in which there is a little person who depends on him for absolutely everything. What better way to christen their new lives, than going on a road trip to try and shake the money tree, and hit up some potential clients for some sales, and some money.

Bunny comes across as one of the most grotesque heroes in literature that I have read. At every turn, he does something only the purest of scumbags would even consider doing, and all the while, he has his impressionable son in tow.

He sells product to people who don’t need it, he tries to take advantage of the elderly, he sleeps with women with the most vile of reputations, he fantasizes constantly about celebrity musicians like Kylie Minogue and Avril Lavigne (in extremely graphic detail, especially with the latter), and he ignores the obvious impairments that Bunny Junior is dealing with. He is an awful father, and an awful person.

Yet, we can’t help hope that things work out for him in the end.

bunny3The Death of Bunny Munro encompasses several subplots, including a madman scouring English towns as a serial killer, dressed in devilish goat horns and red body makeup, terrifying people all across the nation. While this is taking place, Bunny must deal with the visions he has of his dead wife (similar to the visions his son is having about her), and try to remain focused while his life spirals out of control.

This novel is very well written, creating a mood and a tone that is apparent throughout the text. Cave is a master with words, painting pictures that are easily visualized, and never coming across as someone who is a novelist in their spare time. This book writes like it is written by a pro, something that Cave, after two very strong novels, needs to be seen as. He can write more than a passionate and creepy song. In the larger scale, he is able to write a full-sized text, and have it be as completely engrossing as one of his live performances of “Jubilee Street.”

Relatively short in length, The Death of Bunny Munro could easily be a one-sitting novel. It is intriguing, and entertaining. From the beginning, we are forced to wonder if Bunny really will die at the end, as the title suggests, or if he will be able to find some kind of redemption for his life full of sin.

This book is excellent. And not only for fans of Nick Cave. It is just a very good book. Since it happens to be written by a rock star, it will have an immediate audience, but it deserves more than that.

In The Death of Bunny Munro, Nick Cave exhibits once again that he is a true storyteller, and a craftsman with the language of words. This novel is well worth a read for anybody.

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