The Wolf Of Wall Street (Film Review)

The Wolf Of Wall Street (Film Review)

With going to the theater a more rare thing for me, it often takes me a long time to see films that people have been raving about for months. And I am okay with that. I can wait to hear all the reviews about a movie, wait for the awards season to come and go, hear about who was robbed and who earned their statues, etc. And then I can finally sit back, and enjoy a film based on what I want to think of it, without any of the hype getting in the way. Waiting to see big movies has made me a lot more objective.

wolf-of-wall-street1The Wolf of Wall Street is typically the type of movie I would have rushed out to see back in the day. I love all films directed by Martin Scorcese, and I particularly enjoy those in which he has worked with Leonardo DiCaprio, who I believe has become the best actor of this generation, or perhaps tied with Daniel Day Lewis. The movies that these two have made together have all been excellent, and there isn’t a single one that I didn’t enjoy.

In this film, I believe DiCaprio may have given his best performance to date. At least, in the first half of the three-hour movie he does. After the climactic events of the film, he regresses a little to the DiCaprio that we are more used to seeing, and he seems far more hinged and held back than the crazed, greedy, maniac he is in the first half.

The plot of the story is typical for a Scorcese film, and really isn’t that different from Goodfellas, set in a different locale. Man starts from nothing, rises up to be the best, and then the inevitable downfall. There is nothing new here when it comes to the story, but as with all Scorcese films, the best part is how he brings it all out.

For Wolf, he does it through the debauchery of the lead characters’ (Jordan Belfort) life. He loves drugs, and women, and money. He goes on major Qualuude benders, snorts tons of cocaine (from some pretty interesting locations, as well), drinks like a fish, and goes through hookers like candy. Jordan is an insatiable person, in all aspects of his life. He became a self-made, millionaire trader on Wall Street, and lived life in the finest lap of luxury. Before it all blows up in his face, as these things tend to do. But prior to his fall, he gets everything a human could want. The crazy mansion, an armada of impressive sports cars, the gorgeous wife (played impressively by Margot Robbie, who has an awesome Long Island accent, and a beauty that steals several scenes).

Margot-Robbie-Leonardo-Di-CaprioThe rest of the supporting cast in this film is strong as well. Even though I really don’t like Jonah Hill, he was pretty good in his role. The same goes for Matthew McConaughey, who doesn’t get much screen time, but creates a likable character pretty quickly.

I really enjoyed this movie. Even though it is very long, it is definitely entertaining. We like watching Belfort to terrible things to himself and to those around him, because a part of the film is about how he really is a good person, and helpful to those around him. There is a world-record amount of swearing in the film (because apparently people have counted the number of f-bombs in here, and all other movies), tons of drugs, and tons of nudity. A little something for everybody.

My biggest complaint about the transition of this book in to a film (I am currently reading the novel written by Belfort that served as the source material for the movie, I will write a review of the book when I complete it) is that there isn’t much explained about how Jordan managed to make all of his money and this leaves us not really understanding his true genius. Whenever the screen version of Belfort begins to explain how he is messing with the system in order to make millions, he cuts himself off, telling the audience that we either don’t really care about the details, or that we wouldn’t understand it. I believe this took  a lot away from him, because while we know he is clever, we don’t know how clever. Was a lot of his money a fluke? How good was he? For those of us who don’t really understand Wall Street, but want to know more, this movie missed an opportunity to detail a little bit more about the ins and outs of the business. Think of how Oliver Stone’s Wall Street educated us in the sneakiness of insider trading. I wanted some more of that. I didn’t want to be treated as a simple audience member who wouldn’t understand everything. Sure. perhaps I wouldn’t understand it all, but I wanted to at least be given the chance (this rings true in the novel, as Belfort brushes over a lot of the details on how his money was made, although he describes intensely how he went about moving it to the Swiss accounts). Maybe more explanation would have meant an even longer running time, but I would have sacrificed another twenty minutes to find out how the man called the Wolf became the man called the Wolf.

This is not Scorcese’s best movie. I think the story was too simple for it to be that. It misses out on some of the layers that his other work has provided us with, in films such as The Departed. The story is simple, and perhaps it leaves us wanting more. Because we know what is going to happen, perhaps he could have provided us with more insight into the characters. For example, there is a scene described in the novel where Belfort confesses all of his problems to Aunt Emma (or Patricia in the novel). This gives us insight in to him, and their relationship, and the reasons he does so much of what he does. In the film version, all we get is him wondering if she is hitting on him, and him confessing that he is a drug and sex addict. There could have been more here, so that we would care about Belfort in the way we cared about Ray Liotta in Goodfellas, or Robert DeNiro in Casino. For a movie that was this long, there could have been more about this man that we were watching, and loving, on screen. And we all know that DiCaprio has the chops to create a layered character that we can love, or even love to hate.

I truly enjoyed The Wolf of Wall Street. I probably believe that DiCaprio should have finally got his Oscar for this film. God knows he should have had three or four by now, but that is neither here nor there.

If you are on the fence about watching this movie, see it. It lives up to the hype that was created around it, and it will eventually be considered a quintessential part of the Scorcese/DiCaprio collection.

Veronica Mars (Film Review)

Veronica Mars (Film Review)

The largest Kickstarter campaign ever comes to fruition in the film version of the TV show that quickly became a cult classic during its three-year run on the air, the Veronica Mars movie leaves no disappointment for fans of the series.

Ten years after leaving Neptune, Veronica has left her private detective life behind her, and is on the verge of becoming a high end lawyer in New York. Her life has been a success, as we all knew that it would be. She has a degree in psychology, and is weeks away from taking the bar exam. She is interviewing with top firms in NYC, on the cusp of a great career.

Until the call comes in.

“Veronica? I need your help.”

marsDrawn back to Neptune to help out Logan Eckles, her ex-love, who is again facing a murder rap when his former girlfriend and pop singer is found dead in her bathtub (Carrie Bishop, from the original show, although she is no longer played by Leighton Meester, one of the few disappointments in the movie). Of course, Veronica begrudgingly accepts to help him out with finding a lawyer, which turns into a much longer stay than she had intended.

Veronica Mars has everything one could want in a YV series-turned feature film. This was, after all, mostly funded by the fans, who raised millions of dollars to see this made. That is a dedicated fan base.

All of our favorite characters are back, and Kristen Bell, as Veronica, is in her finest form. She is as sharp and witty as ever, now able to say some of the things that she couldn’t on TV (I always enjoy hearing TV characters swear, it is partially unnatural, and partially awesome, because we know it’s what they would have really said, anyways). Even ten years after the first season began, we still love Veronica. She is still the underdog, despite the success in her life. And she continues to fight for what she believes to be right, which is the part of her character that we probably always admired most, even if we didn’t realize it.

There are great nods to the fans, even mentioning the cancelled fourth season where Veronica was to be an intern at the FBI. In the opening minutes, she even calls herself a Marshmallow, the name Veronica Mars fans have adopted for themselves. These subtle nods are fantastic, as they are not punch-you-in-the-face obvious, and it would not detract from a person watching the film as their first exposure to the character. In fact, this film does a good job of being a somewhat stand-alone production, in that you could watch it with someone who was not familiar with the series, and they would easily be able to follow along and enjoy it.

As for the story, and the mystery, it is as solid as always. There are some twists, and it is a good murder mystery, as was nearly every episode of the show. There is no let down here. At an hour and 45 minutes long, it is basically watching two back-to-back episodes, with an entire murder plot crammed in. But it doesn’t feel to rushed. And for fans of the show, watching back-to-back episodes is something that we have all done. Probably more than once. Ok, maybe some of us have managed to watch an entire season in one sitting (that’s a lot of sitting, but it got done!).

Not many actresses really own their character in the way that Bell owns Veronica. She is her. And even though she continues to act, and hasn’t been pigeon-holed due to the success of this show, there will always be a part of Kristen that truly is in a part of this character. We want to see them as the same person, because she is so good as her. Veronica Mars is the girl with the smart answer to everything, but who can also be fiercely loyal and loving at the same time. She uses her sarcasm as a mask, something too many of us are able to identify with. She is the outcast who never should have been the outcast in the first place, but wears her letter with pride, and always manages to hold her head up high, not ashamed of who she is. She is a true television hero.

One of my favorite things about the film is that they did not deviate from the formula of the show. This is exactly what people wanted to see. And they got it. They did not try to go crazy just because there was some more money and a built-in audience. They knew how Veronica Mars worked, and they stuck with it.

As usual, Veronica narrates the film, as the did on the series. She compares her need to help, to be near Logan, near Neptune, as an addiction, something that she dealt with in her life with her mother, and the various issues that floated around the elites of Neptune. It is a clever under-current to the story, the tale of a girl who wants nothing more than to get away, and stay away, but can do nothing of the sort. Another layer to the story, that is great entertainment.

For any fan of Veronica Mars, this movie is an absolute must-see. For those who never watched the show, you can count on a pretty solid murder mystery with some good comebacks and wit.

Just as the show always was.

Smashed (Film Review)

Smashed (Film Review)

Ah, Netflix. I love you because of your random suggestions. Since I watched Drinking Buddies, I might also like…

Smashed.

A quick film about a young married couple (Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul), who have issues with drinking. Like, they enjoy it too much. Both of them are alcoholics, and the film centers around Winstead wanting to get clean, Paul’s refusal, and the way in which alcohol, or the lack of it, drives them apart.

smashed_headerAt the beginning, Smashed seems like it will be a harrowing journey into the lives of alcoholics, in the way that so many substance abuse movies are. We will watch them have fun, then things will turn bad, then they will go through the torturous withdrawal on their way to redemption. I will give this movie credit, in that it isn’t as cookie-cutter perfect as it could have been.

The movie opens with Winstead waking up hungover, getting ready for work, drinking in her car, then throwing up in front of her grade 1 students. Seems like our abuse film is right on track. This leads to a side story, where Winstead says she is pregnant, causing her to be ill. While the story line initially seems kind of pointless, it does lead to a redeeming part later on, so there is definite purpose. Later on, she smokes crack with a stranger. A quick escalation, and we see that she could easily become a complete train wreck.

The best part of the movie is Winstead’s performance. She is confused, and angry, with the choices she has made, and she comes across as genuine throughout the film. She is able to create the performance of someone who is broken, and ready for a change. She drank because it made her feel good. And then it made her feel bad. So she stopped.

And this is the problem with the film. It all seemed too easy for Kate. She went to a couple of meetings, with the guidance of a fellow teacher (played awesomely by Nick Offerman- he has the most memorable, and most awkward, scene in the movie when he is in the car with Kate and admits he has a crush on her), found a great sponsor, and got clean. Sure, there is the inevitable relapse, but Smashed keeps us away from the physical pain of detox. There is no real indication that Kate as any issues with being around others that drink, which I would imagine, is one of the most difficult things for a recovering alcoholic to do. She carries on with her life, does better at her teaching job, before the drift with her husband occurs.

It is nice to see the opposite side of the coin, however, in that alcohol was the thing that kept this couple together. We are more used to seeing how the presence of booze will drive a couple apart. For the most part, it becomes the absence of alcohol that creates their marital issues, as it was something that they could bond over for so many years. For that, Smashed offers a slightly different perspective on the issue.

For the most part of the movie, Aaron Paul is underused. He is a good actor, but the majority of his performance is basically a spinoff of the early Jesse Pinkman on the first couple of seasons of Breaking Bad. He could have been more. He gets to show his acting chops as the movie progresses, but for the most part, I feel he could have done more.

In all, Smashed is just ok. It could have been dark, and gritty, but it only gave us glimpses into that side of alcoholism. This film is carried by the actors that are in it, and for them, it is worth viewing. As a movie that focuses on the pain and desperation of addiction, it does fall a little flat.

Oscars 2014: DiCaprio, Lawrence, Midnight

Oscars 2014: DiCaprio, Lawrence, Midnight

oscarThere was a time when I would take the time every year to go and see the majority of the Oscar-nominated films. I would do my best to see all of the Best Picture nominees, and even make an effort to see some of the acting ones, if they were especially highly regarded, or were of interest to me.

My days of being a cinephile are over, and now I have accepted my fate as someone who will “wait for it to turn up on Netflix,” before checking it out. It may be a sad fate for a fan of movies, but going to the theater has become that much of an expensive inconvenience.

So, this year, I have actually seen almost zero of the films in question. None of the Best Picture nominees, none of the acting ones. I think the only film I have seen is the Best Adapted Screenplay nominated Before Midnight. I wrote a long blog about that movie, and even though I’m pretty sure it won’t win, I will be cheering for it to win, since I hold that film, and the whole trilogy, in the very highest regards.

Without having a vested interest in which films actually win, I am forced to the sidelines, to cheer for people that I hope will win, even though I probably know that they won’t. The way things are looking, it could be a really good day for 12 Years A Slave and Gravity, just based on what I have been reading leading up to the event tonight.

  • I will cheer wholeheartedly for Leonardo DiCaprio. He is, simply put, the best actor of this generation (I would count Daniel Day-Lewis as the best ever, but not of this generation, since he makes so few movies. However, each and every one he makes is worthy of an Oscar). He probably should, or could, have several Oscars by this point in his career. These are some of the movies I feel he could have picked up some hardware for: What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Basketball Diaries, Gangs of New York, The Aviator, The Departed, Blood Diamond, Revolutionary Road, Inception, Django Unchained, The Wolf of Wall Street. That is a pretty hefty list of excellent performances. How has he not won yet? I understand that in a lot of years, it depends on who you are up against, but come on people. This is getting to the point of silliness. Does the Academy hate him just because he was in Titanic? They shouldn’t, since they gave that movie a million other awards. I want him to get his statue. And then I want him to get many more. The Academy has missed the boat too many times with him, and despite his fine performances going unawarded, it is time to start paying him back. leo
  • I know Jennifer Lawrence won a gold guy last year, but I’ll still cheer for her to win another this year. Typically, it seems that actresses are given the Supporting Actress nod before Best Actress, but for Lawrence, I hope she gets one of each. She really is America’s Sweetheart at this moment, and as we know with the media, this won’t last. I want her to get what she can, while she can. She is a great actress, funny, beautiful, and everybody loves her. Plus, in Hollywood, she is actually a great inspiration and role model for girls. There aren’t many.

    PS-I'm fairly sure I'm in love with her.
    PS-I’m fairly sure I’m in love with her.
  • I really do want Before Midnight to win for Best Adapted Screenplay. I truly, and passionately, love those movies, and feel that they should be recognized for what they have accomplished over the past 18 years. And besides, when you are talking about a screenplay, aren’t you looking for something with the most natural dialogue possible? It doesn’t get any more real than this film.
  • For best picture, I actually don’t really care. I would say The Wolf of Wall Street, if only because it is a Martin Scorcese film, and it is pretty divisive, I hear. I like it when there is a little controversy in picks. I’m sure 12 Years A Slave is a great film, but it seems like it just checks too many of the boxes, and seems like a typical Best Picture movie. Typical is boring.

That’s it. No predictions. I am not familiar enough with these films to even make educated guesses. The only one I will assume for sure, will be Frozen winning the Best Animated Feature. There. Lock it up, take it to the bank.

Completing the Trilogy: Before Sunrise/Sunset/Midnight

Completing the Trilogy: Before Sunrise/Sunset/Midnight

Without a shadow of a doubt, the three films Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, and Before Midnight encompass my favorite film trilogy of all time. Okay, maybe I will call it a tie. With The Dark Knight trilogy. People can take their Godfather series, or Star WarsLord of the RingsThe Matrix (does anyone include this in their favorite trilogies?), or whatever other group of three films they can think of, and in my mind, they all pale in comparison.

The three Before movies are perfect, in my mind.

Because they are great films, because they are wonderfully acted and written, because they take place in cities that I hold near and dear to my heart, and because of the emotional significance of the films, and where I was at in my life as each of them was released/viewed for the first time.

The first thing to love about these movies is that they are set in (essentially) real time. Not just within the film itself, but within their release. The first movie came out in 1995, when we first meet Jesse and Celine. The second film was released in 2004, and the events take place 8 years after their first encounter. Finally, the final (?) installment was released in 2013, and the events in the film take place 9 years after the previous one. This is brilliant. We have the chance to truly see these characters grow. There is nothing fake about their relationship, because we see how they are in their different stages of life. As the trilogy progresses, they get older, wiser, and maybe even more confused. And we are allowed to grow with them. This is a true love story, because it takes place over 18 years. Not a weekend, or a senior trip, or a vacation. It is a lifetime.

sunriseSeeing Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) go from fresh and naive characters just trying to figure out their way in the world, to seasoned adults burdened by everything that adults are burdened with, is one of the most refreshing things I have ever seen on the screen. And I can’t think of a couple I have cheered for harder than these two. Sure, you always want the guy and the girl to end up together, but we were left for agonizing years, wondering if they ever met at the train a year after their first meeting, or what would happen if Jesse missed his plane from France on his book tour. For years we waited.

And, in a way, hoped.

As a series, this is perfect storytelling. As individual movies, they are brilliant. I’m not sure how someone could go and watch one without needing to know what happened to the protagonists, but I’m sure those people are out there somewhere. A part of me feels like they didn’t really earn it, not having to wait for the lengthy periods of time between installments, to catch up with them, to know where their lives have taken them. But I hope that they can appreciate it all the same.

sunsetI feel a personal connection to these films, as I’m sure so many people do, because of where my life was in comparison to that of the characters during each installment. From wandering traveler, to on-the-cusp of success, to having a real life, I feel I can mirror them in many ways. They are older than I am in the film (Jesse is 41 in Midnight), but I get where they are at. Their lives are not exactly the same as mine, but there are definite mirrors there, and as director Richard Linklater tends to do, he connects with the audience, and makes them feel like they are watching a part of themselves up on the screen, like he knows who you are, and wanted to make you into a character. He even manages to do this in his lighter films, like Dazed and Confused.

The writing of these movies is excellent, mainly because the script is so loose, and really allows the actors to talk to one another, as real people talk to one another. Considering these films could be viewed as little more than people walking and talking, it seems like it could have been disastrous to just allow Hawke and Delpy to chat, hoping for the best. But they are so natural together, and they play off one another so well, that these films really do represent a slice of life. Some of the most real, albeit often philosophical, conversations one may ever see in a movie. Long takes and very, very, few cuts allow the actors to decide what they want to do with the ideas laid out in the script, and their characters develop in a natural way (this differed slightly on the third film, which, according to IMDB, had a tight script and heavily rehearsed scenes).

before-midnightThe third movie follows suit, with the conversations essentially taking place in five locations: in a car ride from the airport, at dinner with friends, on a walk (of course!) through the streets of a small Greek island village, in a hotel room, and at a waterside restaurant. But Midnight offers us something new that we hadn’t seen in the previous two movies, two movies that filled us with hope and belief that true love can be found in the strangest places: fighting. Before Midnight allows us to see the trials and tribulations of love, even if it is the best love story out there, and the two people we, as an audience, have decided are perfect for each other. Spoilers coming. There are cracks in their partnership. Beginning with Jesse lamenting his son leaving their summer Greek vacation for the States, to be back with his mother, the woman Jesse divorced in order to be with Celine. We learn about their history, after Jesse missed his plane at the end of the second film. The couple lived in New York for a couple of years, and then Paris, eventually having twin daughters while living their lives in Europe. Jesse thinks they need to be back in the US to be with his son, while Celine has decided to accept an exciting job offer in Paris. The cracks begin, and they know it, when Celine states that this is how “relationships begin to end.” Their is now an edge to their relationship. They argue in front of their friends, albeit with passive aggressiveness, but we still that they are still in love. Jesse is a successful author. He has written two books about his life with Celine, something that she is not entirely fond of, as well as a third. His writing is what brings them to Greece, as they are hanging around with other authors. Eventually, we see the blowup between the two of them. And it is a mighty battle. On screen, it is one of the better battles between husband and wife (or in this case, long-term partners, as they aren’t actually married) you will ever see. It is painful, and it is real. 

The culmination, and heartbreaking moment for me was when Celine storms in to the room and announces that she no longer loves Jesse. This crumbles everything that had been created in the whole series. Their love was everything, but even it has its limits. And that was crushing and painful to watch. I won’t spoil the very ending, but Jesse puts it out there that this is real life, and even though it isn’t perfect, it is real. Another great line in a series of films that is essentially a myriad of great lines that manage to strike to the core of the audience. They try to pick up the pieces, reconstruct the fallout of their battle, but we are left to wonder if it will really work, if they are living in illusion, or doing it for real.

I think in a love story so strong, we secretly know that one fight will not bring them down. But we are not given the answer; at least, not the whole answer.

With Before Midnight, we get to see what happens to our favorite romantic couple. Even the most perfect romance is not perfect, and their lives are not a fairy tale. It was a struggle to make things work, and sacrifices were made. Lives were upheaved. Jesse gave up his marriage, and the ability to see his son on a consistent basis. He moved to Europe. Celine gave up her ambitions, her career dreams in order to make a family for them. It could all seem perfect, but the best part about all of this is that the writers, Linklater, Hawke, and Delpy, wouldn’t allow it. They wanted to show us what it would really be like. And I loved them for it.

In an interview, Ethan Hawke said that Before Sunrise is about what might be, Before Sunset is about what could or should be, and Before Midnight is about what is (from imdb.com). He couldn’t have said it better himself. By the end of the the three films, we see kids fall in love, reconnect, and survive.

And we know that they are going to be okay, which is all that really matters, when it comes to Jesse and Celine.

“I f*cked up my whole life because of the way you sing.”

New Trailer: The Fault in Our Stars

When you love a book so much, it is scary to see it come to the big screen. And I love The Fault in Our Stars. I had long wondered why no John Green books had been transformed into films, given that there is such an appeal to his stories, and such a massive popularity among teens. Who of his fans don’t believe that Looking for Alaska, Paper Towns or Will Grayson, Will Grayson would make a great movie? It almost seems as though his novels are made to be classic teen love story films.

I was dreading to see what would become of TFiOS the moment that I heard it was being made into a movie.

And I hate to say it, but I think my fears have been realized. I know that Nerdfighters everywhere will be ecstatic about certain aspects of the trailer. I, unfortunately, am not sold.

The first trailer for the movie has been released, and upon first viewing, I instantly hated it. Upon further viewings, I have softened up my stance, but still am decidedly on the fence as to the results of what this film could be.

The lines, so beautifully written on the page, come across as hokey when heard aloud, delivered by actors (specifically, the actor playing Augustus Waters) that may not have the gumption to handle such a complex role as Hazel and Augustus. The trailer gives us the outline of a definite love story, which the novel is, but holds none of the humour or sarcasm that made the book so completely memorable. If the film lacks this, and it may not, as this is only a preview, then it is simply a sad love story that is left over. And the book is so much more than that. The greatest thing about Hazel in the novel is her unique way of looking at her life. She is going to die, she knows it. She is well aware that she is a grenade, but she deals with this reality in a way so uncommon across literature.

Some positives is that there seems to be many things that have made the cut from the novel into the film. Such as the literal heart of Jesus, a brief glimpse of Hazel reading An Imperial Affliction, going after Isaac’s ex-girlfriend. All of the big speeches from the novel seem to be there as well, although I was pretty surprised to hear chunks of them in the trailer.

I will still see this movie, if only as a sign of my dedication to John Green. As of now, I am uncertain to how it will translate on to the screen, and I am infinitely worried that the incredible story that Green put on to paper will not fully be told on celluloid. Time will tell. I want so badly for it to be a great adaptation. I want to love it like I love the novel. I want to be able to show the movie when I teach this novel to my class, as I already have done a couple of times. I want The Fault in Our Stars, the movie, to be as classic and memorable as the novel.

Truly Terrible: A Good Day To Die Hard

dieWho isn’t a fan of the Die Hard movies? The first two gave us gratuitous bloodshed and fun. The surprising third one gave us a fun puzzle movie, and the fourth, while cheesy and ridiculous, gave us non-stop action and some pretty funny moments between Bruce Willis and Justin Long.

A Good Day To Die Hard, the fifth installment in the series, gave us none of those things, and it was truly an awful movie.

die2First, I’ll mention the good parts. The opening car chase scene was insane and over-the-top, but there was some good destruction. The evil Russian girl is very attractive. And the music in the movie was strong and suspenseful.

And that is it. Everything else about this movie was simply awful, and hopefully represents the death rattle in this series that had become so beloved by so many people (I have just read that they are planning to make Die Hard 6, so there goes that idea). Since there were so many things wrong with this flick, I will give them the quick hit treatment, as to not prolong the suffering.

  • Bruce Willis got old. And looks bad.
  • Bruce Willis was pretty much reduced to a sidekick in the movie. Unfortunately, his son, the hero, is awful.
  • Terrible acting, highlighted by how bad the son was (Jai Courtney was deplorable).
  • Insincere and forced relationship storyline between father and son (and did I miss this from the previous movies, but since when does John have a son?).
  • There is no real plot. Something about people trying to get plutonium out of Chernobyl.
  • Is it really safe to be wandering around Chernobyl with no radiation suit?
  • It is set in Russia. It doesn’t fit for this movie and ruins the idea of John McLane as an American hero.
  • Who is actually the villain in this movie?
  • The editing was terrible and seemed thrown together, especially during the action scenes.
  • There was not a single funny line in the film. Usually you can expect a couple of good one-liners in this series. None to be seen here.
  • Some pretty cheesy CG at the climactic helicopter scene of Willis.
  • It runs at about an hour and a half. I would have been pissed if I had paid to see that in the theatre.
  • McLane doesn’t seem to get hurt. Ever. He used to be loved because he was an everyman hero. Now he is practically indestructible. And it ruins his character.

I could probably go on. This movie deserves its place among Top 10 lists of the years worst films. I’m just going to go ahead and forget that this installment even exists, and enjoy the Die Hard series as a group of four films.