Sherlock: Seasons 1 & 2 (TV Review)

Sherlock: Seasons 1 & 2 (TV Review)

After sitting forever in my Netflix queue, I finally got around to watching the first two seasons of the always highly recommended by others, Sherlock. That may seem like a lot of TV watching over a couple of days, but as it is a British series, each “season” is only three episodes long (each episode is about an hour and a half, however).

Pouring through the first couple of years, I wondered why I had been so hesitant to begin watching this show.

sherlockLike other British crime shows, Sherlock offers more than the North American fare. Shows like CSI, or The Mentalist, have always lacked something, a certain depth that is too rarely explored on American network TV. Here, we all know that the good crime shows with the real depth are on the cable networks, like AMC’s The Killing. But there has been a boon of very strong British crime drama of late, and along with The Fall and LutherSherlock deserves its place among the elite.

The premise of the show is easy, and we all know about Sherlock Holmes. Here we are given the introduction between Sherlock and his dear friend Watson at the beginning of the series, and from there we are taken off on their crime-solving adventures. The show is set in modern times, but there are always good nods to the classic tales of Sherlock Holmes, like the occasional incorporation of the famed hat.

Our modern version of Sherlock isn’t a pipe smoking sleuth, he is a “high functioning sociopath” that is trying to quit smoking cigarettes, has no time for social niceties, and is an absolute genius. Our new version of Sherlock is able to process massive amounts of information, making him a formidable opponent for any criminal activity.

As the series progresses, we see Sherlock go from an unknown entity who simply helps out the police now and then, to being known as an incredible crime solver, thanks to the blog of his friend Watson. The blog brings him fame, and unwanted attention, as he must deal with becoming a bit of a celebrity while just trying to find cases that satisfy his massive intellect, and ego, and will keep him entertained.

This fame raises the show to its climactic events at the end of season two, which culminates the battle between Sherlock and his greatest criminal opponent, Moriarty.

With each episode spanning nearly an hour and a half, each one is like a movie. There is an opportunity to develop a complex plot, as well as move the characters, and their lives, forward. This is where we get the depth in the show, as we get to know them all better, and begin to understand them more. Throw that in with some classic British wit, and there is a winning combination.

Something else that is found in a large number of British dramas is the quality of the acting. They always seem to have top-notch people fill out the roles, from the top to the most minor of characters. The same can not often be said about US counterparts.

sherlock2The lead roles are played by Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman (as Sherlock and Watson, respectively). And they are played especially well. Major credit goes to Cumberbatch, who truly owns the titular role, and makes the show as good as it is. Sherlock is a genius, and an egomaniac, straining all of the relationships he has with people. When he goes on one of his rants used to explain what is happening, it is great acting. Cumberbatch’s rapid fire speeches that remain eloquent in their own way engross the viewer, managing to explain so much, in such a small amount of time. He carries the show, as he should, and everybody else is a spectator in his life. Due to his mastery in the role, Cumberbatch has become a serious celebrity, and a fan girl’s dream. And, justifiably so. He truly is great here.

The mysteries themselves are always very solid in the show, some of them are completely engrossing. Certain episodes are simply great. The events of “The Hounds of Baskerville” are suspenseful and intense, the battles with Moriarty are great, and the inclusion of “The Woman” add a whole new twist to the show. Each episode is well thought out, interesting, and intense. It is a delight for viewers of mystery and suspense.

The show succeeds where I believe both Sherlock Holmes films failed. Despite the genius of Robert Downey Jr., those films were simply not great, in my opinion. There were simply put, dull. Sherlock avoids those trappings, and remains entertaining in each episode.

Everything about Sherlock is strong, from top to bottom. I have nothing to complain about with the series, and would definitely recommend giving it a watch, if you haven’t already.

It is great fun, seeing what will unfold from 221B Baker Street.

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Eating Edmonton: Craft Beer Market

Eating Edmonton: Craft Beer Market

It’s hard not to love all of the places opening up in Edmonton that specialize in good food and good beer. Because, food and beer are some of my favorite things in the world.

It took me a lot longer to get out to Craft than I would have expected, especially with its convenient downtown location, right across the street from the Sherlock Holmes pub. Well, it is convenient if you actually manage to get parking downtown without having to pay and arm and a leg for it. But this is less of a problem in the evening, once the workday crowd has mostly dispersed. Still, don’t expect to get one of the very few spots right across from Craft. Plan to walk a few blocks.

craft2First off, the space that Craft has is incredible. It is very large, two floors, and has recently opened their rooftop patio for the summer months. The space is very open, spacious, and tastefully decorated. It has the feeling of a beer hall, but classier, not unlike other establishments of this ilk.

The staff are pretty quick, friendly, and attentive, and you are greeted warmly upon entering the building. There are various table sizes, which is a nice option depending on the size of your group, with tables and booths aplenty.

One of the most impressive things about the place is the kegs of beer everywhere. If you accidentally wander down the wrong staircase trying to find the washroom, as I did, you will get to the basement level that includes a room with hundreds upon hundreds of kegs of beer in it. Momentarily, I believed it to be heaven. You can also see the beer on the main and upper floor, as it is contained in glass rooms, similar to how it is in Beer Revolution in Oliver Square.

The food at Craft is good. As is expected now, they have a full and interesting menu of what I call Pub Grub+. Typical fare for this kind of place, but it is really tasty, and not simply sloppy chicken wings. It actually took our group a while to decide on what to eat, because there was definitely more than one enticing option. Pretty much every appetizer sounded delicious. But we had to restrain ourselves.

As for the beer selection, well, it is probably second-to-none in Edmonton. I believe there are over 100 beers on tap, and they are changed regularly. This is awesome. It can be difficult to navigate the beer menu, simply because there are just so many to choose from, and it can become quite overwhelming, if you don’t really know what you want. The servers are very knowledgeable about what they serve, so don’t hesitate to ask about a certain beer, or describe what you are looking for. They will be able to help you out with that, which is always nice.

Because of its food and drink, Craft would seem like a place that could become a home away from home for me. But for one thing: the prices.

I get it. Craft beer is all the rage. Pub Grub+ food is all the rage. And you can expect to pay for quality. I don’t mind paying for quality.

But Craft Beer Market has priced itself out for me. This cannot be a place where my friends and I hang out for an evening and sample different beers. I would go broke, especially when the majority of beers at Craft are over $9.

$9!!

While the food prices are only slightly above average in comparable pubs, it is the drinks that will absolutely destroy your bank account. This makes Craft a perfect place to come after work for a meal and a beer, but little more than that. Sadly, I am not a one beer type of person, and the price just adds up far too quickly for me. It would be great to be able to spend some time there, and sample a lot of the different beers that they have to offer, since it is such an amazing selection, but I don’t feel like selling my car just yet. I feel that the high prices are actually a detriment to the sampling of new beers, simply because I am nervous about spending $9.25 on something I have never tried before. If it isn’t very good, then that is a large waste of money, when I could have just been smarter, and gone for the $8.25 Sapporo that I know is good.

Me complaining about it won’t change the prices, and from what I’ve heard, Craft has been very successful since its opening in Edmonton, which is great. It continues to be nice to see downtown being revitalized with new places all the time, creating a place that is good for the older crowd that has mostly tired of Whyte Ave.

Craft is great, if you have the money.