The Wolf Of Wall Street (Film Review)

The Wolf Of Wall Street (Film Review)

With going to the theater a more rare thing for me, it often takes me a long time to see films that people have been raving about for months. And I am okay with that. I can wait to hear all the reviews about a movie, wait for the awards season to come and go, hear about who was robbed and who earned their statues, etc. And then I can finally sit back, and enjoy a film based on what I want to think of it, without any of the hype getting in the way. Waiting to see big movies has made me a lot more objective.

wolf-of-wall-street1The Wolf of Wall Street is typically the type of movie I would have rushed out to see back in the day. I love all films directed by Martin Scorcese, and I particularly enjoy those in which he has worked with Leonardo DiCaprio, who I believe has become the best actor of this generation, or perhaps tied with Daniel Day Lewis. The movies that these two have made together have all been excellent, and there isn’t a single one that I didn’t enjoy.

In this film, I believe DiCaprio may have given his best performance to date. At least, in the first half of the three-hour movie he does. After the climactic events of the film, he regresses a little to the DiCaprio that we are more used to seeing, and he seems far more hinged and held back than the crazed, greedy, maniac he is in the first half.

The plot of the story is typical for a Scorcese film, and really isn’t that different from Goodfellas, set in a different locale. Man starts from nothing, rises up to be the best, and then the inevitable downfall. There is nothing new here when it comes to the story, but as with all Scorcese films, the best part is how he brings it all out.

For Wolf, he does it through the debauchery of the lead characters’ (Jordan Belfort) life. He loves drugs, and women, and money. He goes on major Qualuude benders, snorts tons of cocaine (from some pretty interesting locations, as well), drinks like a fish, and goes through hookers like candy. Jordan is an insatiable person, in all aspects of his life. He became a self-made, millionaire trader on Wall Street, and lived life in the finest lap of luxury. Before it all blows up in his face, as these things tend to do. But prior to his fall, he gets everything a human could want. The crazy mansion, an armada of impressive sports cars, the gorgeous wife (played impressively by Margot Robbie, who has an awesome Long Island accent, and a beauty that steals several scenes).

Margot-Robbie-Leonardo-Di-CaprioThe rest of the supporting cast in this film is strong as well. Even though I really don’t like Jonah Hill, he was pretty good in his role. The same goes for Matthew McConaughey, who doesn’t get much screen time, but creates a likable character pretty quickly.

I really enjoyed this movie. Even though it is very long, it is definitely entertaining. We like watching Belfort to terrible things to himself and to those around him, because a part of the film is about how he really is a good person, and helpful to those around him. There is a world-record amount of swearing in the film (because apparently people have counted the number of f-bombs in here, and all other movies), tons of drugs, and tons of nudity. A little something for everybody.

My biggest complaint about the transition of this book in to a film (I am currently reading the novel written by Belfort that served as the source material for the movie, I will write a review of the book when I complete it) is that there isn’t much explained about how Jordan managed to make all of his money and this leaves us not really understanding his true genius. Whenever the screen version of Belfort begins to explain how he is messing with the system in order to make millions, he cuts himself off, telling the audience that we either don’t really care about the details, or that we wouldn’t understand it. I believe this took  a lot away from him, because while we know he is clever, we don’t know how clever. Was a lot of his money a fluke? How good was he? For those of us who don’t really understand Wall Street, but want to know more, this movie missed an opportunity to detail a little bit more about the ins and outs of the business. Think of how Oliver Stone’s Wall Street educated us in the sneakiness of insider trading. I wanted some more of that. I didn’t want to be treated as a simple audience member who wouldn’t understand everything. Sure. perhaps I wouldn’t understand it all, but I wanted to at least be given the chance (this rings true in the novel, as Belfort brushes over a lot of the details on how his money was made, although he describes intensely how he went about moving it to the Swiss accounts). Maybe more explanation would have meant an even longer running time, but I would have sacrificed another twenty minutes to find out how the man called the Wolf became the man called the Wolf.

This is not Scorcese’s best movie. I think the story was too simple for it to be that. It misses out on some of the layers that his other work has provided us with, in films such as The Departed. The story is simple, and perhaps it leaves us wanting more. Because we know what is going to happen, perhaps he could have provided us with more insight into the characters. For example, there is a scene described in the novel where Belfort confesses all of his problems to Aunt Emma (or Patricia in the novel). This gives us insight in to him, and their relationship, and the reasons he does so much of what he does. In the film version, all we get is him wondering if she is hitting on him, and him confessing that he is a drug and sex addict. There could have been more here, so that we would care about Belfort in the way we cared about Ray Liotta in Goodfellas, or Robert DeNiro in Casino. For a movie that was this long, there could have been more about this man that we were watching, and loving, on screen. And we all know that DiCaprio has the chops to create a layered character that we can love, or even love to hate.

I truly enjoyed The Wolf of Wall Street. I probably believe that DiCaprio should have finally got his Oscar for this film. God knows he should have had three or four by now, but that is neither here nor there.

If you are on the fence about watching this movie, see it. It lives up to the hype that was created around it, and it will eventually be considered a quintessential part of the Scorcese/DiCaprio collection.

Oscars 2014: DiCaprio, Lawrence, Midnight

Oscars 2014: DiCaprio, Lawrence, Midnight

oscarThere was a time when I would take the time every year to go and see the majority of the Oscar-nominated films. I would do my best to see all of the Best Picture nominees, and even make an effort to see some of the acting ones, if they were especially highly regarded, or were of interest to me.

My days of being a cinephile are over, and now I have accepted my fate as someone who will “wait for it to turn up on Netflix,” before checking it out. It may be a sad fate for a fan of movies, but going to the theater has become that much of an expensive inconvenience.

So, this year, I have actually seen almost zero of the films in question. None of the Best Picture nominees, none of the acting ones. I think the only film I have seen is the Best Adapted Screenplay nominated Before Midnight. I wrote a long blog about that movie, and even though I’m pretty sure it won’t win, I will be cheering for it to win, since I hold that film, and the whole trilogy, in the very highest regards.

Without having a vested interest in which films actually win, I am forced to the sidelines, to cheer for people that I hope will win, even though I probably know that they won’t. The way things are looking, it could be a really good day for 12 Years A Slave and Gravity, just based on what I have been reading leading up to the event tonight.

  • I will cheer wholeheartedly for Leonardo DiCaprio. He is, simply put, the best actor of this generation (I would count Daniel Day-Lewis as the best ever, but not of this generation, since he makes so few movies. However, each and every one he makes is worthy of an Oscar). He probably should, or could, have several Oscars by this point in his career. These are some of the movies I feel he could have picked up some hardware for: What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Basketball Diaries, Gangs of New York, The Aviator, The Departed, Blood Diamond, Revolutionary Road, Inception, Django Unchained, The Wolf of Wall Street. That is a pretty hefty list of excellent performances. How has he not won yet? I understand that in a lot of years, it depends on who you are up against, but come on people. This is getting to the point of silliness. Does the Academy hate him just because he was in Titanic? They shouldn’t, since they gave that movie a million other awards. I want him to get his statue. And then I want him to get many more. The Academy has missed the boat too many times with him, and despite his fine performances going unawarded, it is time to start paying him back. leo
  • I know Jennifer Lawrence won a gold guy last year, but I’ll still cheer for her to win another this year. Typically, it seems that actresses are given the Supporting Actress nod before Best Actress, but for Lawrence, I hope she gets one of each. She really is America’s Sweetheart at this moment, and as we know with the media, this won’t last. I want her to get what she can, while she can. She is a great actress, funny, beautiful, and everybody loves her. Plus, in Hollywood, she is actually a great inspiration and role model for girls. There aren’t many.

    PS-I'm fairly sure I'm in love with her.
    PS-I’m fairly sure I’m in love with her.
  • I really do want Before Midnight to win for Best Adapted Screenplay. I truly, and passionately, love those movies, and feel that they should be recognized for what they have accomplished over the past 18 years. And besides, when you are talking about a screenplay, aren’t you looking for something with the most natural dialogue possible? It doesn’t get any more real than this film.
  • For best picture, I actually don’t really care. I would say The Wolf of Wall Street, if only because it is a Martin Scorcese film, and it is pretty divisive, I hear. I like it when there is a little controversy in picks. I’m sure 12 Years A Slave is a great film, but it seems like it just checks too many of the boxes, and seems like a typical Best Picture movie. Typical is boring.

That’s it. No predictions. I am not familiar enough with these films to even make educated guesses. The only one I will assume for sure, will be Frozen winning the Best Animated Feature. There. Lock it up, take it to the bank.