“The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer” (Book Review)

“The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer” (Book Review)

During the height of its popularity, people debated the secrets of Twin Peaks all the time. It became the most popular show to create water cooler discussions, since there was always so much going on, so many strange things, and so many secrets.

One of the secrets of the show was the mysteries held within the diary that Laura Palmer kept, and left behind with her Meals on Wheels shut-in friend before she died.

The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer was released between Seasons 1 and 2 of the show, and provided die-hard viewers with some major insight into one of the major characters of the show- even if she was never actually alive on it. The book became a New York Times best seller, and was penned by the daughter of series creator David Lynch, Jennifer Lynch.

laura3Instead of arguing about the merits of the writing- it does a good job to read mostly like a diary written by a teenage girl- it is more important to focus on the things that it revealed about Laura, as her secrets were beginning to become exposed on the show.

Laura was definitely the epitome of a character struggling with duality. She was a good girl gone bad, and The Secret Diary takes us through her fall from grace, as she discovers her raucous sexuality, and love of drugs, particularly cocaine. Laura is constantly conflicted about who she is. She is the teen queen of Twin Peaks, respected and loved by all, but she has a very dark side that she tries her best to cover up. She falls in with the wrong people, and makes poor decision after poor decision, always trying to escape her own dark side by doing things that ironically bring her closer to the dark side.

One of the interesting tidbits from the book are her involvement with BOB, the psychotic killer and representation of all evil, that haunts her, and taunts her, throughout her life. It is the interactions that she has with BOB that lead her to sleepless nights, which eventually lead her further into drugs and sex. For those who have watched Twin Peaks, and understand the role that BOB had in her death, it is an interesting case of foreshadowing, without revealing too much about how she is going to end up dead.

But she knows that she is, that she has started down a path that will provide no happy ending for her.

The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer offers us some nice insight for the show. It creates a back story for the most secretive character in the town. Many of the things that emerge from the diary are seen or re-created in the film prequel to the series, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, which chronicles the final week of Laura’s life prior to her murder. For those who would have read the book between the seasons, it also gives us a little information that is not revealed until season 2, which would have made people who read the book know things that others did not, such as the final location of her true diary. There are also clever tie-ins with the show, in that some pages of the diary are ripped out, as they are in the show. This is done so that not too much is revealed, such as the killer, or the twisted relationship that she had with her father. It is one of the more intelligent book tie-ins to go along with a television series: giving us enough to keep watching, but not so much that we have no reason to keep viewing. It is a good teaser.

laura2Laura is a messed-up girl. As we move forward through the series Twin Peaks, we realize how damaged and broken she was, that she was not the prom queen that everybody wanted to see in her. She was a tortured soul, and barely kept her life together for a long time before she died.

There are a couple of curious things that the book raises. How was Laura able to be such a good person, while hiding such a dark side? As in, how did she have enough time to tutor Johnny Horne, deliver Meals on Wheels, teach Josie Packard English, go to school, date Bobby Briggs, do a ton of cocaine, work at Horne’s department store, also work at One Eyed Jack’s, sleep with half the town of Twin Peaks, participate in forest orgies, maintain a friendship with Donna Hayward, and fall for James Hurley? This is the busies girl of all-time! Also, she tried very hard to hide her dark side from the outside world, trying to keep it contained. But judging by the amount of sex, partying, and drugs that she took part in, how is it that nobody ever revealed or spoke about her secrets? How could her wild life, which involved so many people from the town, still be unknown to everybody? These are the slight flaws that are raised by The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, simply because we now know so much more about her than we do from just watching the show.

This is definitely a quick read, and a pretty good one for true fans of the show. It allows us to see behind the character that really serves as the centerpiece of the show, since it is her death that brings everything together, and begins to unravel the secrets of the mysterious town.

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“Wrapped in Plastic. Twin Peaks.” (Book Review)

“Wrapped in Plastic. Twin Peaks.” (Book Review)

The day that Laura Palmer was found dead on the beach in the small Washington town of Twin Peaks, a cult-classic was unleashed.

Even though the series only lasted for a total of 30 episodes spread across two uneven seasons, Twin Peaks has remained a phenomenon, and consistently viewed as a show that was able to change the face of network television. 30 episodes have created a ton of fan websites, a yearly festival, magazines, books, and even after much desire from the public, who was both fans of the show when it initially aired, and those who have discovered it in the quarter-century since, there will be a new run of episode of Twin Peaks starting in 2016.

plastic2I have written a few items on the show on this blog, as well as more on my often-neglected Twin Peaks blog. If you want to read a review of another book related to the show, please check out https://gatsbyfuneral.wordpress.com/2014/12/13/reflections-an-oral-history-of-twin-peaks-book-review/.

Wrapped in Plastic. Twin Peaks provides us with another view on the series, and one that is incredibly well done in a very short amount of space. As a part of the Pop Classics collection (which also includes books on Showgirls and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles), this story of Twin Peaks is done in a great way that provides more information for the Peak Freak out there, as well as the casual viewer, or one just getting into the show. There is much repeated information in here, if you are a die-hard fan and follower of the show, but it still provides enough insight to keep it interesting, over its very brief 101 pages.

Something I especially enjoyed about the book was the nods to the humour in the show. So many things that are written about Twin Peaks focus on the darkness, on the strangeness, and on the the murder of Laura Palmer, and then the following decent of the show from the heights of pop culture after the murdered was revealed. But so many people forget that there were so many moments in the series that were very humorous, and they no longer deserve to be neglected. Author Andy Burns does a great job of reminding us of those funny moments, and how it added so much to the show, as well as giving us a break from the messy lives of the people that inhabited the small town.

plastic3Wrapped in Plastic also does a strong job of citing the influence that Twin Peaks has had on modern television. We often hear about how influential it was, but Burns goes to the point where he describes the impact that this show had on other major dramas of our time, from The Sopranos to The X-FilesNorthern Exposure to Psych. It really brings everything all together, and after reading the book, it gave me a new appreciation of how important this series really was in changing the way that networks viewed the shows they were airing, and how people were watching them, and what they were willing to deal with.

Burns takes us quickly through the development of the series, the casting, and the magic of David Lynch and Mark Frost in creating the show, along with notes on several of the episodes in the series. He writes like he truly loves the show, which is great, because let’s be honest…the vast majority of the readers of this book are also going to be fans of the show, and want to read about it by someone who loved it too. He also focuses a fair amount of his time on the development of the themes in the series, such as the duality of the characters, demonstrated primarily by the role of the Black Lodge, and the dopplegangers that are found within. I found this quite interesting, especially when many more connections were made to the prequel film, Fire Walk With Me, as it offered me some views that I had not thought of before.

While Wrapped in Plastic is not as in-depth and intensive as something like Reflections: An Oral History of Twin Peaks, it still manages to get to quite a bit. With the book being so short, I had no trouble reading it in one sitting, in a little over an hour. This speaks not only to the brevity of this work, but to the readability of it. It is very interesting, and it is always great to be taken back into the town of Twin Peaks, and into the lives of the characters in it. And Burns does a great job of doing that, exploring the relationships between the characters, pointing out his observations, along with generally maintained theories about the show.

For those die-hard fans of Twin Peaks, who are clamoring for something to keep them occupied until the much anticipated Mark Frost novel, The Secret Lives of Twin Peaks comes out at the end of the year, and then the 2016 episodes, Wrapped in Plastic is a fantastic place to get back into the world of our favorite town. It does well to be nostalgic, so fans can remember the lofty heights of the show, even remembering its demise with some affection, and it does well to look forward, to see how the fingerprints of Twin Peaks are all over our current television landscape.